English to English

On the 150th anniversary of Abraham Lincoln’s delivery of the Gettysburg Address (and no, unidentified but still appreciated Guardian reader, he did not “bloody rob the thing off Pericles or something”), Englishman Martin Pengelly writes:
The Gettysburg Address is a foundation stone of American history, but like the Declaration of Independence (which it cites), it also resonates around the world. Lincoln’s words speak clearly to those of us who are from countries, however benignly governed, in which all men are not deemed to be equal. It speaks more urgently to those still living under slavery, or theocracy, or dictatorship.
Conclusive advantage: US High-res
On the 150th anniversary of Abraham Lincoln’s delivery of the Gettysburg Address (and no, unidentified but still appreciated Guardian reader, he did not “bloody rob the thing off Pericles or something”), Englishman Martin Pengelly writes:

The Gettysburg Address is a foundation stone of American history, but like the Declaration of Independence (which it cites), it also resonates around the world. Lincoln’s words speak clearly to those of us who are from countries, however benignly governed, in which all men are not deemed to be equal. It speaks more urgently to those still living under slavery, or theocracy, or dictatorship.

Conclusive advantage: US