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- Katie Rogers
The Washington City Paper, a DC publication known for gleefully raking people in the District over the coals, has apparently decided to torture a local mixologist this week. The task: mixing a Marmite cocktail. And you know what? I can’t really hate on this. I think if you’re going to force someone to consume Marmite, you might as well make sure there’s plenty of whisky in the glass. 
Here’s what writer Adele Chapin had to say about it: 

The drink itself was knock-out spicy, but the marmite made the cocktail taste as savory as a bouillon cube, followed by an odd, lingering sweet flavor. A lot was happening here. The grapefruit and smoky whisky was somewhat masked by the one-two punch of the spice and the marmite, but it did temper the heat somewhat. The drink had a gutsy, in-your-face boldness.

Knock-out spicy! In-your-face! This all sounds so un-British. 
Advantage: USA. Because no. 
(Photo: ChicagoReader.com) 

- Katie Rogers

The Washington City Paper, a DC publication known for gleefully raking people in the District over the coals, has apparently decided to torture a local mixologist this week. The task: mixing a Marmite cocktail. And you know what? I can’t really hate on this. I think if you’re going to force someone to consume Marmite, you might as well make sure there’s plenty of whisky in the glass. 

Here’s what writer Adele Chapin had to say about it: 

The drink itself was knock-out spicy, but the marmite made the cocktail taste as savory as a bouillon cube, followed by an odd, lingering sweet flavor. A lot was happening here. The grapefruit and smoky whisky was somewhat masked by the one-two punch of the spice and the marmite, but it did temper the heat somewhat. The drink had a gutsy, in-your-face boldness.

Knock-out spicy! In-your-face! This all sounds so un-British. 

Advantage: USA. Because no. 

(Photo: ChicagoReader.com